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WTPS: Teddy for England

Posted on 30 September 2001  - 12:00

Tottenham Hotspur (Spurs) Football Club is located in North London. The club is also known as Spurs. Tottenham's home ground is White Hart Lane. The club motto is Audere est Facere (To dare is to do).

Terry Venables leads the calls for Teddy Sheringham's England recall in his column in the News Of The World and the tabloids all join the chorus for our in-form captain and striker to face Greece.

Former Spurs and England boss Venables says of Teddy: "He's playing as well as anyone in the Premiership right now and a lot better than most.

"He is proving his worth again now and playing every bit as well as he did last season. I actually think Manchester United are missing him. The thing with Teddy is that you only realise what you've got when he's not there."

The Sunday Express predict Teddy will get that call with a back-page lead and People sports editor Paul McCarthy's column is on the same subject.

All the newspapers rave about Saturday's amazing encounter against Manchester United.

The Observer describe United second half display as '41 minutes of magic and Ian Ridley's report reads as follows...

Every young boy may grow up wanting to be a Manchester United player but, trust me, you would not have wanted to be one at half-time here. United trailed 3-0, out-thought and outplayed by Tottenham Hotspur. Then Sir Alex Ferguson, known to dispense the odd word of wisdom in somewhat graphic terms to errant employees, had his say.

Inspired by Juan Sebastian Veron, they came out to produce one of football's most remarkable comebacks thanks to a five-star second-half performance that was as astonishingly good as the first half's had been astonishingly poor. Having conceded five goals in 50 minutes - including the two against Deportivo in midweek - their response was five scored in 45.

The gap in status, and achievement, of two of England's most venerable clubs has widened considerably over the past decade but it remains a fixture to quicken the pulse. For United, there was certainly extra edge to the game given their, by their standards, indifferent start to the season.

Ferguson's team selection reflected his desire to build some confidence after the midweek Champions League defeat in La Coru-a. Though Ryan Giggs was rested, it was ambitious - Andy Cole partnering Ruud van Nistelrooy in attack and Paul Scholes withdrawn to midfield - and close to full-strength, Nicky Butt the replacement for the suspended Roy Keane. The Tottenham manager, Glenn Hoddle, gave a debut to his £8 million signing from Southampton, Dean Richards at the centre of his back three.

'I'm sure Deano's going to be a major asset to our defence and to our set plays because he does come up with goals,' Hoddle wrote in his programme notes and it did not take long for the player to prove it. Spurs won a corner on the right and from Christian Ziege's kick, Richards nipped ahead of his marker to glance home a fizzing header at the near post.

It capped a promising start to the game with United moving the ball slickly through midfield with some neat one-touch passing. Tottenham, though, stuck to them and United were restricted to long shots.

Butt, Scholes and Veron were also having trouble coping with a tenacious Tottenham trio in midfield of Darren Anderton, Gus Poyet and Steffen Freund. It meant that Spurs, playing Hoddle's favoured 3-5-2 to Ferguson's trusted 4-4-2, often had a man free in a wide position. In addition they had Teddy Sheringham in a withdrawn role, the former United man testing Laurent Blanc with a series of astute balls forward.

On the right, Mauricio Taricco frequently found room and it was he who began the move that led to Tottenham doubling their lead. Little seemed on, though, when the ball found Anderton but his pass found Poyet, who had not been tracked , and when the Uruguayan clipped a neat ball into space, Les Ferdinand spun sharply off Blanc, slow to react and playing him onside, before driving home a fierce low shot.

United were stunned, by Tottenham's pressing and physical commitment, Butt a victim when he was forced from the field after being clattered in the ribs by Taricco. Ferguson's response was to throw on yet another forward in Ole Gunnar Solskjaer but still United looked ragged of shape, still forced to shoot from distance, Neil Sullivan dealing capably with shots from David Beckham - United captain from the start for the first time - and Veron.

When Tottenham broke, United's midfield was often left trailing embarrassingly and Spurs revelled in the space. A third came in added first-half time. Taricco found Poyet on the right and after jinking inside Denis Irwin, he crossed for Ziege to head firmly past Fabien Barthez.

After the Ferguson roasting and re-organisation, United pulled a goal back within a minute of the restart. Beckham sent in Gary Neville for a right-wing cross that Cole dived to head in from the edge of the six-yard box. Now there was intent to United, and a better balance, Solskjaer and Mikael Silvestre shoring up the left, enabling Veron to move more profitably infield.

It wasn't long before Beckham sent in a corner that Blanc planted home with a firm header. Spurs were reeling, scarcely able to get the ball out of their own half as United passed it slickly through and around them.

The equaliser came when Solskjaer found Silvestre on the left and the hitherto subdued Van Nistelrooy rose to head down past Sullivan. From there, the win was claimed when Veron drove low into Sullivan's left corner from 18 yards before Beckham drilled a half-volley into the other. The game may be about deeds, and United's yesterday were as stirring as they come, but it is amazing what a few choice words can do as well.

On the rumour front, the People link former boss Keith Burkinshaw with a return to the Lane after quitting his job as director of football at Aberdeen, the Express suggest Spanish outfit Valencia are looking at Sergei Rebrov and the Mirror link Tim Sherwood with a move to his former club Norwich City.

Meanwhile, back in the Observer, Ian Ridley's interview with Tony Adams on England and Sven Goran Eriksson reveals the defender's belief that Glenn Hoddle could still be the man for England.

Adams is quoted: "I should say at this point that I still believe Glenn Hoddle is the man for the England job. It just came five years too early for him, before he could develop properly his man-management skills, and perhaps let go of his player's mentality. I know these days that I am coming to the end and can think like a manager or a coach, and sometimes have to remember not to lose sight of my own job as a player, so I understood how he felt. I had the impression that Glenn wished he could be still chipping the ball up and putting it into the back of the net.

"Eventually, I really do want an English guy in charge - and I am convinced Glenn will go on to be one of the best managers we have produced - but one with the demeanour and style of a Wenger or an Eriksson."