Skip to main content

News

  • Fredi on Mali mayhem
Subscribe to newsfeed 

Fredi on Mali mayhem

Posted on 1 April 2005  - 12:00

Tottenham Hotspur (Spurs) Football Club is located in North London. The club is also known as Spurs. Tottenham's home ground is White Hart Lane. The club motto is Audere est Facere (To dare is to do).

Fredi Kanoute points out he was not aware of himself or his Mali strike partner being subjected to death threats following Togo taking the lead in the final minute of the World Cup qualifier on Sunday night.


Reports suggested Fredi and Mamadou Bakayoko were the target of angry chanting followed by a pitch invasion, adding he was in fear of his life.


"I just want to clarify a few points," said Fredi back at Spurs Lodge. "I updated my website and some papers made things sound worse than they were.


"It was a difficult situation but it was not aimed only at me. It was reported that fans wanted to kill me and I was scared to death - I have never said that. I just said it was a difficult time, yes they invaded the pitch and it was hostile.


"It was not against me, I was a bit upset about it, but I didn't fear for my life like it is being made out.


"When they came on the pitch the security couldn't handle it, it was too much for them. That was it, we stayed in the dressing room for a while because we couldn't get out. When it calmed down a little bit we were able to go back to the hotel and then the training camp.


"I didn't feel anything was aimed at me personally or my strike partner. It was exactly the same for every player, if it was difficult for me it was as difficult for everybody."


Fredi added that he is considering his international future on the basis of security at a number of venues. A decision will be taken after consultation with his teammates and federation.


"I will consider my future, but only on the principal of security. In Africa we have had problems with security, at some places there is very little and it can be difficult to play there. Every African player would say that, if you talk to Noureddine Naybet and Thimothee Atouba they have some amazing stories about it.


"I don't want to accept this as normal because it is not. It is not a football problem, for me it is sometimes a social and economic problem. Usually in the countries which are not very rich, when you have an opportunity to express your feelings it can be through football and sometimes you can't control it.


"I will go back to Mali and I am not scared - I know people won't do anything to me. Things can happen anywhere in the world. I don't know if I will go back soon for football because I was upset about it, but I will talk to my fellow players and the federation before making a decision."